Merganser

(Mergus merganser)


Facts

Merganser IUCN LEAST CONCERN (LC)

 

Facts about this animal

The goosander is a large “sea” duck, mostly found in freshwater habitats. They are excellent divers and are characterised by long bills with a hooked tip and serrated edges, used for catching fish. The body-weight of males is about 1670 g, of females about 1540 g.

 

Nest sites are preferably in tree cavities. 9 to 10 cream-coloured eggs are laid, which are incubated by the female alone for 32-35 days.

The food of the goosander consists mainly of fish, but also of bivalve shells, snails, leeches, aquatic lizards, crays, and frogs.

Did you know?
that goosanders are also as often known as "sawbills" because of the serrated edges to their bills?


 

Factsheet
Class AVES
Order ANSERIFORMES
Suborder ANSERES
Family ANATIDAE
Name (Scientific) Mergus merganser
Name (English) Merganser
Name (French) Harle bièvre
Name (German) Gänsesäger
Name (Spanish) Serreta grande
Local names Europe (UK): Goosander
Netherlands: Grote Zaagbek
Italy: Smergo maggiore
Sweden: Storskrake
Russland: Bolshoy Krokhal
CITES Status Not listed
CMS Status Appendix II (as Anatidae spp.) Included in AEWA

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Mdf

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Europe, North Asia, North America
Habitat On and along wooded lakes, rivers and coastal areas where trees are large enough to provide cavities for nesting
Wild population Unknown
Zoo population 65 reported to ISIS (2006)

In the Zoo

Merganser

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Note 18 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
Toivo Toivanen & Tiina Toppila

Why do zoos keep this animal

The merganser, or goosander, is not a threatened species. Zoos keep them for educational purposes as an ambassador species for river conservation, and for improving the negative reputation they have with fishermen.