Locust

(Locusta migratoria)


Facts

Locust IUCN NOT EVALUATED (NE)

 

Facts about this animal

Locusts are large grasshoppers that travel in huge swarms over long distances and cause great damage to crops and other plants.

Female locusts produce hundreds of eggs that hatch and grow in four stages: the youngest "hopper" stage without wings; the "jumper" stage when wings begin to develop; the "biter" or "cutter" stage which describes the nearly full-grown locust; and finally the sexually mature stage.

Locusts feed exclusively on plants. A male needs during its development about 30 g of plant material to reach its adult weight of 2 g. A female needs 44 g of food to reach a body weight of 3 g.

Did you know?
that the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations monitors the movements of major locust swarms and publishes current information on their website?


 

Factsheet
Class INSECTA
Order ORTHOPTERA
Suborder CAELIFERA
Family ACRIDIDAE
Name (Scientific) Locusta migratoria
Name (English) Locust
Name (French) Criquet ravageur, Criquet migrateur
Name (German) Wanderheuschrecke
Name (Spanish) Langosta migradora
Local names Afrikaans: Sprinkaan
isiZulu: Intethe
kiSwahili: Nzige msafiri
Malagasy: Valala
seTswana: Tsiakgope
siSwati: In-tsetse
CITES Status Not listed
CMS Status Not listed

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Vladimír Motyčka

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Locusta migratoria migratoria: Central Asia to South-East Europe Locusta migratoria migratorioides: Africa Locusta migratoria capito: Madagaskar Locusta migratoria manilensis: South-East Asia.
Habitat Deserts, semi-deserts, grasslands, savannas.
Wild population No data
Zoo population No data

In the Zoo

Locust

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport Container Note 62 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
Vladimír Motyčka

Why do zoos keep this animal

Zoos keep locusts for educational reasons to explain the food chain, and also because it is referred to in the bible, e.g. as a plague that the Lord sent upon Egypt.

Surplus will be used for feeding insectivore animals.