Lowland Anoa

(Bubalus depressicornis)


Facts

Lowland Anoa IUCN ENDANGERED (EN)

 

Facts about this animal

The Lowland Anoa is a tiny bovine with plumb body, a thick neck and short, antelope like, delicate legs. The head-body length is 170-190 cm, the height at the shoulder 80-100 cm. It weights up to 300 kg. The coat is sparse and short to almost hairless (woolly on juveniles). The colour is dark-brown or black, with lighter underparts. Females may be lighter in colour than males. The legs are white or yellowish white from the wrists and heels down, with a black line down the front and across the fetlocks.

 

There are various whitish areas on the face and the neck, such as a white crescent on the throat, may occur. The ears are moderately sized and pointed. The horns are short (20-40 cm) and straight, triangular in cross-section at the base and flattened, with marked transversal ridges and lateral keel. They are directed backwards nearly in the plane of the face. The tail reaches almost to the hocks and has a small bushy tip.

Did you know?
that anoas are the smallest cattle on earth? They are often called dwarf water buffalo, as that is their closest relative.


 

Factsheet
Class MAMMALIA
Order ARTIODACTYLA
Suborder RUMINANTIA
Family BOVIDAE
Name (Scientific) Bubalus depressicornis
Name (English) Lowland Anoa
Name (French) Anoa des plaines
Name (German) Flachlandanoa
Name (Spanish) Anoa de llanura, Anoa de llanura
CITES Status Appendix I
CMS Status Not listed

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Bluemoose

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Indonesia (Sulawesi)
Habitat Undisturbed lowland forested areas and swamps
Wild population Approx.: 3'000-5'000 (2001)
Zoo population 108 reported to ISIS

In the Zoo

Lowland Anoa

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Note 73 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
Bodlina

Why do zoos keep this animal

The lowland anoa is an endangered species, and habitat loss and degradation, and unsustainable harvesting are going on. The building up and maintenance of a viable ex situ reserve population thus makes sense. Therefore, an International Studbook and two regional coorinated breeding programmes (EEP and SSP) have been established.