Aruba Rattlesnake

(Crotalus unicolor)


Facts

Aruba Rattlesnake IUCN CRITICALLY ENDANGERED (CR)

 

Facts about this animal

The Aruba rattlesnake is a small, light grey or grey-brown snake. It has overlapping dorsal scales that are a pale brown in colour and triangular in shape. The head and neck have a pair of stripes that may extend well onto the body. Adults reach a length of close to one metre.

Aruba Island Rattlesnakes are live bearers with a four month gestation. The young are about 20 cm in length and are venomous at birth.

Did you know?
that Aruba rattlesnakes have heat sensing pits which they use to locate prey?


 

Factsheet
Class REPTILIA
Order SQUAMATA
Suborder SERPENTES
Family CROTALIDAE
Name (Scientific) Crotalus unicolor
Name (English) Aruba Rattlesnake
Name (French) Crotale d'Aruba
Name (German) Aruba-Klapperschlange
Name (Spanish) Cascabel de la Isla Aruba
CITES Status Not listed
CMS Status Not listed

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Trisha Shears

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Aruba Island
Habitat Rocky, dry areas with cactus scrubs and thorny plants
Wild population It is estimated that fewer than 230 adults survive in the wild (Wikipedia 2012).
Zoo population The total population registered by the International studbook (WAZA - ISB) is 223 animals (end 2004).

In the Zoo

Aruba Rattlesnake

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Note 44 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

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Wikipedia

Why do zoos keep this animal

The Aruba rattlesnake is listed as threatened by the US Endangered Species Act. This species is managed in North American Zoos through a Species Survival Plan (SSP) in which zoos work cooperatively with each other.