Gharial

(Gavialis gangeticus)


Facts

Gharial IUCN CRITICALLY ENDANGERED (CR)

 

Facts about this animal

The snout of the Gharial is extremely long and slender, abruptly narrowed against the brain part of the skull (in contrast to the false gavial, Tomistoma schlegelii), about 3.5 to 6 times as long as broad at the level of the front corners of the yes. There are no elevated structures in front of the eyes. The colour of the upper body surface in adults is almost greyish black, juveniles are more or less dark olive, speckled with black and with black crossbands. The lower surface is uniformly light, without dark blotches. The iris is greenish. It can potentially grow up to 7.2 m, but is usually about 4.5 m.

Did you know?
that the gharial is considered to be one of the most critically threatened of all crocodilians, becoming alarmingly close to extinction in the 1970s? Fortunately, there has been some recovery through conservation programmes, and a reasonable amount of hope lies with the conservation and management programmes, which are now in place.


 

Factsheet
Class REPTILIA
Order CROCODYLIA
Suborder EUSUCHIA
Family CROCODYLIDAE
Name (Scientific) Gavialis gangeticus
Name (English) Gharial
Name (French) Gavial du Gange
Name (German) Ganges-Gavial
Name (Spanish) Gavial del Ganges
CITES Status Appendix I
CMS Status Appendix I

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Justin Griffiths

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Bangladesh , Bhutan (?) , India , Myanmar (ex) , Nepal , Pakistan
Habitat Rivers
Wild population Approx. 2'500-3'500. It last hideaways are heavily threatened through human influence and are dwindling.
Zoo population 32 reported to ISIS (2005)

In the Zoo

Gharial

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Note 42 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
Justin Griffiths

Why do zoos keep this animal

The keeping and breeding of Gavialis gangeticus coordinated by an international conservation breeding program is of great importance. Nevertheless it is still only rarely exhibited in zoos.