Kiang

(Equus kiang)


Facts

Kiang IUCN LEAST CONCERN (LC)

 

Facts about this animal

The kiang is a robust equine with an erect mane and an ass-like tail. It is the largest of the Asiatic wild asses reaching an average shoulder height of 150 cm. The ears are relatively short (17 cm). The coat is reddish brown in colour with whitish underparts and muzzle. It is smooth and short-haired in summer, and very shaggy in winter.

Did you know?
That kiangs live in herds that can number several hundred individuals? Such herds are made up of mares with their young and immature males and females. They are led by an older mare. Stallions tend to live alone or with other stallions, joining the herd only during the breeding season.


 

Factsheet
Class MAMMALIA
Order PERISSODACTYLA
Suborder HIPPOMORPHA
Family EQUIDAE
Name (Scientific) Equus kiang
Name (English) Kiang
Name (French) Kiang, Ane sauvage du Tibet
Name (German) Kiang, Tibetanischer Halbesel
Name (Spanish) Kiang
CITES Status Appendix II
CMS Status Appendix II (as Equus hemionus sensu lato)

 

 

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Distribution

 


Distribution
Range China, India, Nepal
Habitat Dry open areas including desert, semidesert, or steppe
Wild population Between 60.000-70.000 (2002) (Red List IUCN 2011)
Zoo population On January 1, 2008, 124 kiangs were registered with the International Studbook.

In the Zoo

Kiang

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Note 73 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations, should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
Bodlina

Why do zoos keep this animal

The kiang is still a lower risk species. It used to be, however, a rare species in zoos, and was therefore included into the International "Asiatic Wild Asses" Studbook, which was set up in 1961 under the auspices of WAZA primarily with a view to contributing to the conservation of the more endangered Asiatic wild ass subspecies. Zoos maintain now a self-sustained and steadily growing population of kiangs managed under regional conservation breeding programmes.