Steenbok

(Raphicerus campestris)


Facts

Steenbok IUCN LEAST CONCERN (LC)

 

Facts about this animal

The steenbok is one of the dwarf antelopes. Its head-body length ranges from 70 - 95 cm, the shoulder height from 45 - 60 cm. The steenbok has a very short tail of only 4 - 6 cm length. Only the males have short vertical horns, which range in height from 9- 19 cm. The coat is reddish-fawn, with a white throat and belly. Steenboks have large, white lined ears. Their hooves are sharp and serve a variety of functions.

Did you know?
that steenbok mark their territories with dung-middens? These middens are connected by trails which, through use, become marked with secretions from the pedal glands.


 

Factsheet
Class MAMMALIA
Order ARTIODACTYLA
Suborder RUMINANTIA
Family BOVIDAE
Name (Scientific) Raphicerus campestris
Name (English) Steenbok
Name (French) Raphicère champêtre
Name (German) Steinböckchen
Name (Spanish) Racifero común
Local names Afrikaans: Steenbok, Vlakbok
isiNdebele: Ingina, iqhina
isiXhosa: Itshabanqa
isiZulu: Iqhinaki
Swahili: Dondoro
oshiVambo: oMabundja
otjiHerero: oMbuindja
sePedi, seTswana: Phudufuduse
Sotho: Thianechi
Shona: Mhenesi
Lozi: Kabu
siSwati: Lingcinatshi
Venda: Phuluvhuluxi
Tsonga: Xipene
CITES Status Not listed
CMS Status Not listed

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Hans Hillewaert

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Southern and eastern Africa
Habitat Savannah
Wild population Excess of 600,000 (1999) (Red List IUCN 2011)
Zoo population 32 reported to ISIS

In the Zoo

Steenbok

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Requirement 73 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Road transport (according to the South African Standard SANS 10331): Transport in individual crates under tranquillization. The crates should be placed transversely on the transport vehicle, so that the heads of the animals face outwards.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
rjh

Why do zoos keep this animal

The steenbok is a very attractive small antelope that would fit very well into multispecies exhibits displaying the Southern African habitats where it occurs. Nevertheless, only very few zoos keep steenboks. this may be due to the fat that the steenbok is one of the more common antelopes that is still widely distributed even in areas where most of the larger species have become locally extinct.