Blue-winged Goose

(Cyanochen cyanoptera)


Facts

Blue-winged Goose IUCN VULNERABLE (VU)

 

Facts about this animal

The blue-winged goose is a medium-sized sheldgoose with a body weight of about 1.5 kg.

4-9 creamish-coloured eggs are laid and incubated for 30-34 days by the female alone.

The blue-winged goose is a largely nocturnal species. It feeds on grasses and other green parts of various plants; insects and small reptiles

Did you know?
that, during courtship, the male struts around the female, his head bent over his back, and his bill pointed skywards or behind him? Such posture exposes his blue wing patch. He communicates with the female with a barely audible whistle "wnee-whu-whu-whu-whu-whu-whu-whu".


 

Factsheet
Class AVES
Order ANSERIFORMES
Suborder ANSERES
Family ANATIDAE
Name (Scientific) Cyanochen cyanoptera
Name (English) Blue-winged Goose
Name (French) Ouette à ailes bleues
Name (German) Blaufl├╝gelgans
Name (Spanish) Ganso aliazul
CITES Status Not listed
CMS Status Appendix II (as Anatidae spp.)

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Mike Barth

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Highlands of Ethiopia
Habitat Grassy meadows and pastures above 1400 m adjacent to rivers, lakes and pools which lack dense marginal vegetation; does normally not enter deep water.
Wild population According to thw 2007 Red List the total population is probably lying in the range 5,000-15,000 individuals (IUCN Red List). Still considered locally common within its very restricted range. It is not threatened by hunting since religious beliefs have prevented its being hunted, but under pressure by rapid growth of human population and concurrent transformation of its habitat.
Zoo population 57 reported to ISIS (2008)

In the Zoo

Blue-winged Goose

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Note 17 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
Mike Barth

Why do zoos keep this animal

The blue-winged goose is not very often kept by zoos. It may be kept for educational purposes to demonstrate the diversity of the sheldgeese or in the context of themed exhibits on the Abyssinian highlands.