Cururu Toad

(Rhinella schneideri)


Facts

Cururu Toad IUCN LEAST CONCERN (LC)

 

Facts about this animal

Females up to 25 cm, males smaller. Active at sunset and at night. Bufo paracnemis has not only poison glands on either side of its head, as other toads but also on its back legs, as well.

Did you know?
Bufo paracnemis is considered to be conspecific to Bufo schneideri. Thus Bufo schneideri is considered to be synonymous to Bufo paracnemis.The scientific name is derived from the so called „Paracnemis glands“ at the legs of this toad. From these glands (as well as from the Paratoid glands at the side of the head) Bufo paracnemis can squirt a poison, which when it touches the eyes or mucous membranes burns painfully. A dog that has taken such a toad in its mouth will immediately and yowling release it.


 

Factsheet
Class AMPHIBIA
Order ANURA
Suborder NEOBATRACHIA
Family BUFONIDAE
Name (Scientific) Rhinella schneideri
Name (English) Cururu Toad
Name (French) Crapaud géant
Name (German) Rokoko-Kröte
Name (Spanish) Cururú o sapo buey
CITES Status Not listed
CMS Status Not listed

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Dawson

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Argentina, Bolivia , Brazil , Paraguay , Uruguay
Habitat Found in various habitats. Although it occurs mainly in open and urban areas, it is also found in the Chaco, Cerrado, and Atlantic Forest regions, preferring still waterbodies without much vegetation. It adapts well to anthropogenic disturbance.
Wild population It is very common. Its range appears to be contracting in northern Cordoba and Jujuy, Argentina. The population trend is decreasing (Red List IUCN 2012).
Zoo population 28 reported to ISIS (2007)

In the Zoo

Cururu Toad

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Note 45 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
Ana Laura Correa & Ismael di Tada