La Loma Robber Frog

(Pristimantis caryophyllaceus)


Facts

La Loma Robber Frog IUCN LEAST CONCERN (LC)

 

Facts about this animal

Species of Eleutherodactylus are generally cryptically colored. Eleutherodactylus caryophyllaceus exists in different colour variations (e.g. yellow with small black and white spots and a red iris or brownish with white spots on the snout and a reddish-brown iris). It has a size of 25 mm. It breeds by direct development, which means that eggs hatch directly into small frogs, completely bypassing the tadpole stage. This adaptation may be largely responsible for their ecological and evolutionary success. The females lay their eggs on leaf surfaces and guard them.

Did you know?
that the genus Eleutherodactylus is the largest vertebrate genus, with over 700 species?


 

Factsheet
Class AMPHIBIA
Order ANURA
Suborder NEOBATRACHIA
Family LEPTODACTYLIDAE
Name (Scientific) Pristimantis caryophyllaceus
Name (English) La Loma Robber Frog
Name (Spanish) Pristimantis caryophyllaceus
CITES Status Not listed
CMS Status Not listed

 

 

Photo Copyright by
Andreas Hertz

Distribution

 


Distribution
Range Colombia; Costa Rica; Panama
Habitat This species occurs in the leaf litter and low vegetation of primary lowland moist and wet forest, premontane wet forest and rainforest in the montane regions on the Atlantic drainage and along the Pacific drainage. It is found in puddles, cart tracks filled with water, and shallow banks of creeks and rivers.
Wild population The species has disappeared from lower portions of its range.The population trend is decreasing (Red List IUCN 2012)
Zoo population 4 reported to ISIS (2007)

In the Zoo

La Loma Robber Frog

 

How this animal should be transported

For air transport, Container Note 45 of the IATA Live Animals Regulations should be followed.

 

Find this animal on ZooLex

 

Photo Copyright by
Andreas Hertz

Why do zoos keep this animal

Neotropical frogs are threatened by habitat distruction, disease and other factors. Zoos and aquariums keeping these species want to build up reserve populations and to raise awareness of the global amphibian crisis. Several zoos have also linked their ex situ activities with involvement in in situ conservation.